89. THE POWER OF HONESTY

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One of my first jobs in the early nineteen-eighties was working at a Target store here in Littleton, Colorado. The night shift and nature of our duties was anything but glamorous. Being good at pushing a broom, scrubbing toilets, and vacuuming are not strong points on anyone’s resume’ and bragging rights to the speed at which one can walk every aisle seven times in eight hours will empress very few. Because of this it was difficult to find anyone willing to do the work, let alone keep them for any length of time. Many came and went, in fact when I eventually became supervisor the rate of turnover was revealed to be on average at least once a week. It was a hard, continuously moving job with lousy hours and I do not miss it in the slightest.

One of my supervisors who lasted a little longer than some was a fella I’ll call Frank. He was best described as a “cool jerk”. He had a big mouth just like me but his delivery was somewhat louder and defiantly more caustic. Insults rolled out of his pie hole more than any situation warranted. Usually they came out as goofy and humorous in nature, but they really were constantly annoying. Such crude indignities as “Eat a rock, Kiss my whatever, and Up yours!” were bland and fairly easy to ignore, but they were nonetheless delivered disrespect and ignorance. Frank was obviously the playground bully who hadn’t outgrown the need to shove others around in order to elevate himself to a false sense of superiority. All of us put up with his incessant blithering for months until one guy showed up as part of our crew.

I instantly liked David. He was kind, hard working, focused and fun to be around. He was also the first Mormon I’d ever worked with. His faith showed in his actions and there was never any reason to mistrust or belittle him. This, however, did not stop Frank from directing his barrage of mindless chatter elsewhere. In fact, because David’s manners were humble and peaceful, he focused even more energy towards him in an effort to get a reaction. For weeks David turned his cheek, mostly because Frank was our boss, but more because he didn’t want to be the type who would let pointless opinions affect his demeanor.

Then one night EVERYTHING changed……

David had been with us for probably two months now. As usual, at the allotted time, we made our way to the breakroom and sat down to our perspective tables to eat lunch.  This particular night Frank was going out of his way to be excessively obnoxious and all of his energy was directed towards David. He was doing his best to block the verbal abuse with a newspaper when I saw from his perspective that he’d finally had enough. David casually flipped down the edge of what he was reading and stared at his abuser. Frank had this huge dopey grin on his face thinking he had finally gotten under the skin of his victim. He was waiting anxiously to see what kind of reaction was coming. What happened next was probably one of the funniest things I’ve ever witnessed in my life. David slowly folded and placed the paper on the table in front of him and calmly said one sentence to Frank while staring directly into his eyes.

“Well……..at least I’m not fat.”

That was the hardest moment of my life I ever had keeping a straight face. Frank was stunned. He sat straight up and seemed to turn to stone. David, on the other hand, picked up his paper and continued to read while finishing his lunch.  Frank was self-conscious about his weight to begin with, and while I never considered his girth to be out of the ordinary, he did. Frank didn’t speak to him for the rest of the night, in fact I don’t think he EVER spoke to David much after that incident except to ask him to do something as a manager.

Eventually David went on to a different job and a better future, but I never forgot the lesson in honesty he presented so perfectly.  In his absence he left us with a quieter less aggressive supervisor. There’s no doubt in my mind his gentle resolve still to this day serves all who came in contact with him.

Should we always turn away from meaningless insults for the rest of our lives? Yes, I believe we should when they come from strangers and temporary associates, but when they are constantly delivered from those we are bound to, then absolutely not. Why? Because if nothing else when bullies receive no resistance, their behavior inevitably becomes magnified and that behavior can lead to hurting others even if it REALLY doesn’t bother you.

When honesty is used as a defense (NOT as an offence, huge difference) there are few countermeasures capable of blocking it. David was not mean or nasty with his delivery, just forthright. And Frank, when confronted with the truth, had nothing to say against it because any kind of resistance would look like he was unaware of the obvious, which no one wants to admit to.

I must confess, I’ve used this tactic on an extremely limited basis. Not because I don’t think it will work, obviously it will, it’s just that in my opinion I feel it’s a last-resort technique. If done properly the likelihood it will sever all ties between you and your perceived aggressor is quite high. Just because someone is thoughtless or annoying a few times doesn’t mean this person has no value in life. Remember this, people only treat us the way we allow them to treat us, and that’s a fact.

Yes, the truth may indeed set you (and those who suffer with you ) free………..

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With Love and Compassion, Daniel Andrew Lockwood

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One comment

  1. Hahahahaha, yes, I definitely laughed over the “fat” remark…. especially when said in such a matter of fact, dry, confident manner. “Hey, it is what it is… so you’re fat… so what?” Hahaha!!! But largely, I agree with your two main tenets: 1. Honesty is authenticity, so it is something you can allow yourself to feel free and receptive towards…. and 2. People will treat you however you allow them to treat you.

    I agree with you that just because you KNOW something to be “true” or honest for you… doesn’t mean you HAVE to share it. I agree that if you are coming from a place of inspiration, compassion, empowerment, etc…. all open, receptive frequencies….. then sharing your perspective of honesty will move you forward in a positive direction.

    However, if you are coming from a closed frequency – anger, hate, fear, jealousy, retribution, etc… then generally speaking you get back what you dish out. That’s not always a super positive thing – though there are no such things as mistakes in this universe. If you dish out negative and get back negative, that’s still a worthwhile lesson in my book. Lord knows I’ve learned that one umpteen million times, and still maintain a thick head, hahaha!!!

    Also… I want to clarify that when I use the terms “positive” and “negative,” they’re not synonymous with “good” and “bad.” They’re more synonymous with “that which is wanted,” and “what which is unwanted.”

    Also, I also want to clarify, that if a person is largely in a frequency of fear, anger is actually a vibrational IMPROVEMENT, haha. So, for example…. if you have a battered wife who is fearful of her husband, and finally, she reaches her last straw and ALLOWS herself to move into the space of anger to actually stand up for herself and yell in anger towards her husband to STOP, she is actually moving “higher” or “forward” in vibrational frequency…… so for her, this would likely be a “positive” step.

    As is everything in the universe, there is “one size fits all” advice. However, you can only take a scenario and illustrate the “best fit” solution for that scenario….. and when it’s illustrated with humor, it makes it all the more fun to read, haha. LOVED this piece!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

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